Session Schedule

Monday, November 13th 8:00 AM

Band Directors’ Ensemble (2 hours and 15 minutes)

Band Directors’ Ensemble – Peter Boonshaft

These sessions will allow band directors to develop and experience rehearsal technique, effective conducting, new repertoire, standard literature, warm-ups and how to develop ensemble concepts, with the goal of creating even better rehearsalsch. Don’t miss this opportunity to learn and perform with Peter Boonshaft.

Choral

Strategies for Success with Beginning Choral Singers – By Regina Carlow

We know that choral singing is a thriving and growing art form. Nearly 1 in 5 people sing in community, school and church choirs in the US. Performance levels of the choral art are the highest in decades. Yet there is a troubling decline in choral singing for school-aged children. Research shows the hidden curriculum in music- often unstated values and cultural norms, turn many singers away. This workshop will discuss and demonstrate strategies for working with beginning choral singers of all ages and is organized around the acrostic WARMTH: welcoming, artistry, motivation, technique and hope. Come ready to sing!

Composition

Composition for General Music Classes, and for Special Learners – By Rhoda Bernard & Sheena Dhamsania  

In the 2014 Music Standards, creating has been elevated to one of three artistic processes, making the creative activity of composing more relevant than ever! Many in the profession, however, are unsure of how best to implement the creating process components of imagine, plan and make, evaluate and refine, and present. Examples of student work will be presented, along with music-composition teaching strategies and lesson ideas. Participants in this hands-on session will interact with these process components. The focus will be on how to implement the creating process with general music classes and for special learners through composition.

Higher Education

Widening Understanding: Incorporating Cultural Diversity into an Online MME Degree – By Craig Resta

The role of cultural diversity in music education has become increasingly important in recent years. Gaining a pluralistic understanding of the world around us can help music teachers better serve their students and communities. This session will discuss how cultural diversity is incorporated into an online Master of Music Education degree at a sample American university. Topics include curriculum-coursework-assignments, philosophical perspectives, and related issues on the value of incorporating culturally diverse perspectives in higher music education study. The better teachers understand their children, the more successful their own teaching, and the musical and creative learning of their students.

Non-traditional Ensemble

Tech & Uke and Uke & Tech: So Happy Together! – By Kris Gilbert

Ukuleles are a hot trend in education right now! We will jam along with classics and current trending songs as well as learn how to create dynamic play-along tutorials by using GarageBand, iMovie and YouTube. Utilizing play-alongs is a great way to get your whole class jamming together or even in small groups. Step-by-step instructions and tutorials will be shared so that you can start creating your own tutorials when you arrive home. Don’t have ukes at your school? That’s ok! The same concepts can be applied to all Modern Band instruments. Bring a uke if you have one!

General Interest

“We do this already!” – Teachers & Data: Support Your Teaching and Student Growth – By John Wayman

Evaluation is a two way conversation not only for your students, but you and your administrators. Administrators, more often than not, do not speak the language of music; therefore, it is our responsibility to learn how to effectively communicate and support the success of our teaching in a language they can understand…data.

General Interest

Assess Yourself: Student-created Rubrics in the Music Classroom – By Heather D. Waters

How might your fourth-grade student describe a “proficient” recorder performance? Do your students clearly understand why they received a particular grade? Does your administrator ask for clear and specific evidence of student learning? In this session, we will explore connections to general education and music education research regarding rubric creation, and effective processes for facilitating student-created rubrics in your music classroom.

Sponsored Sessions

Windows to Creativity: Practical Ideas to Increase Student Engagement and Understanding through Movement, Visual Art, and Theatre – By Nan L. McDonald

Come and explore creative ideas to easily enrich and augment your K-6 general music teaching. Participants will sing, move, create, respond, perform, and understand as they incorporate visual art and reader’s theatre into several music lessons.

Sponsored Sessions

Full STEAM Ahead: Powering STEAM Integration through Technology – Catherine Dwinal

The importance of music to a well-rounded education is no surprise to music teachers! The recent focus on the arts in the national conversation is a great opportunity to celebrate the natural cross-curricular connections in general music. Participants will explore how to shine a spotlight on the arts through an interactive demonstration of Quaver STEAM projects that place music at the center of the elementary curriculum.

TI:ME

Technology is Changing all the TI-ME – By John Mlynczak

Technology in education allows us to teach students in a more efficient and interactive manner than ever before; however, also presents additional challenges of learning to navigate the ever-changing landscape of education technology. John Mlynczak, TI-ME President, will present the current trends in music technology in order to assist educators in making well-informed pedagogical decisions. This session will outline the most useful music technology solutions and products, and discuss the benefits of joining the TI-ME music technology community.

TI:ME

CompositionCraft: Composing using Minecraft – By Daniel Abrahams

In this hands-on session, participants will explore CompositionCraft – a music composition modification (Mod) for the video game Minecraft designed by the University of Arkansas’ Music Education and Tesseract programs. CompositionCraft allows users to compose and create music that iconically represents musical notation creating and experience for students connecting STEAM initiatives and the artistic processes in the National Core Arts Standards. Participants will brainstorm how they might be incorporate this Mod in their music classrooms.

Sponsored Sessions

Engaging and Communicating with School Administrators – By Brian Bubach

As professional educators, communication and correspondence with school administrators can bolster education opportunities. In this session we’ll review some tenets and examples in communicating needs and making requests; then, we’ll open the floor to ask questions and share best practices.

Sponsored Sessions

All in for Music – By John Jacobson

New Resources for the Elementary General Music Classroom. We’re in! Are you in? With these new resources, your students, parents, and administration will be ALL IN for music this year! Choose from musicals, all-school revues, song collections, and 2-part choral arrangements that will enhance your curriculum, energize your classroom, and emphasize the value of music education for every child!

Sponsored Sessions

Modern Band, Part 1: Popular Music Methods – By Scott Burstein

This six session workshops centered around the belief that all people are musical, demonstrated by leveraging the musical choices of the individual. This is achieved through the performance of modern band music – culturally relevant music of students taught through approximation, music acquisition theory, and social equity. Participants will learn the basics of popular music instruments, focus on reading iconographic notation, utilize improvisation, and demonstrate how all people are musical and can enjoy playing through familiar repertoire.

 

Monday, November 13th 9:15 AM

General Interest

Mindsets, Motivation and Performance: Tips for the Music Educator – By Marjorie LoPresti

Motivation. Practice. Stress. Performance anxiety. These are topics well known to musicians, and to students, teachers, and professionals alike. Their effects on students can impact individual learning, performance, and the progress of whole classes and ensembles. Some recent topics of discussion among neuroscientists, psychologists, and educators can help us help our students–and ourselves–to cope better, learn more, and perform at a higher level. LoPresti will present an overview of some recent research and concrete strategies to use with your students. Attendees with an interest in brain-based learning and neuroscience will be invited to share their knowledge and experience during the discussion segment.

Choral

Beyond Sound: More than Singing in the Elementary and Middle School Choral Rehearsal – By Sandra Doneski

Attendees will take part in activities and strategies that engage students in more than participating in the choral rehearsal, but in understanding and shaping the choral rehearsal. Using Wiggins’s and McTigue’s (2005) framework of “Big Ideas” and “Essential Questions” along with the artistic processes that frame the 2014 National Standards, our students are encouraged to enter into the choral rehearsal as more than receivers of instruction but as shapers of the music-making process. Creating, performing, responding and engaging with a variety of repertoire empower students to become lifelong makers of music.

General Music

Engaging All Learners: Tools and Techniques to Reach Different Types of Learners in the Music Classroom – By Brian J. Wagner

A session showcasing how different musical activities can be taught and differentiated to reach various types of learners, specifically focusing on special learners. You will see how: music literacy, active listening, and composition can be taught to all learners. You will leave with ideas and resources that can be adapted into your own classroom.

Guitar

Teaching Guitar: Tips and Tricks That Work – By Glen McCarthy

Guitar is the instrument that can help school music programs reach students not currently involved in music classes. Strategies for starting and equipping a guitar class will be presented. Participants will discover the unique qualities of the instrument that make it the perfect vehicle for improvising, composing and learning how to read music.

Band, Orchestra, and Chorus are the backbone of school music departments. If the average percentage of a school population that takes these classes is 30%, how do we engage the other 70%? Guitar is one way to engage the students not taking music. Music for All!

General Interest

“Dude, You’re a Fag”: On being a gay music teacher in the South. Perspectives from 2000 to today. – By Webb Parker

An openly gay male student asked, “What’s it like being a gay choir teacher in the South?” After answering his question publicly, this student approached me after class and said, “It’s great to finally have a mentor who gets it.” Not having thought of myself as a mentor, I soon began to ponder as to if my experiences as a closeted high school teacher had had an effect on my approach to pedagogy as an openly gay college professor. This session explores my experiences as a closeted high school choir teacher and the experiences of my college students who are now in their first years of teaching.

Students with Differences/Disabilities

Making Music Accessible, Equitable and Inclusive – By Paige Vass, Claire Leeper, and Daniel Upton

Breaking down barriers will provide secondary music teachers simple strategies that will allow them to grow their programs by making the ensemble experience accessible to all students, including those with disabilities, first generation musicians, English Language learners, and those with limited resources due to socio-economic disadvantage. We will explore strategies for creating an inclusive culture, collaborative relationships, and student partnerships that support equity and inclusion. This is a hands-on learning experience for all educators looking to make music available for all and may need a starting point, troubleshooting for experiences, or a fresh perspective to support growth in their program.

Sponsored Sessions

Making the Most Out of MusicFirst Academy – By James T. Frankel

We know that music educators are responsible for teaching anything from beginning to guitar or Latin ensemble to middle school chorus and kindergarten general music. Our courses aim to cover a wide breadth of content needs relevant to these settings from assessment strategies to creative composition pedagogies. We also understand that music educators are faced with the challenge of merging new, exciting technologies with traditional music classroom settings. As a result, we offer courses that not only teach you how to use these software tools, but also how to successfully integrate them into creative lesson plans for your students.

Sponsored Sessions

Get Your Littles Moving: Laban-Based Activities for Young Students – By Missy Strong

Did you know that movement can and should be a part of every lesson you teach, especially in the early years? Learn the rationale behind using Laban-based movement to bolster musicality, as well as a sequential and practical approach to including movement instruction in your classroom. Incorporating these fun and developmentally appropriate movement activities will help your students build a solid musical foundation for future music instruction. You will leave with practical and engaging ideas to get your students moving right away.

Sponsored Sessions

QuaverMusic.com DEMO: Technology Integration – By Catherine Dwinal

From 1:1 tablets to Chromebooks and everything in between, today’s music classroom is digital – and Quaver has the functionality to help teachers easily manage every technology scenario without juggling dozens of separate apps. Get your tech questions answered and try Quaver apps with your own two hands in this open time for tech exploration!

TI:ME

Creative Collaborations & Songwriting: Leveraging Available Technology for Awesomeness – By Meredith Allen

Music is a universal language that should be composed, created and celebrated in classrooms across the globe. Available music tools, programs, classroom ideas, and success stories of music collaborations will be highlighted and explored in this session.

TI:ME

Tech tools for assessment in the music ensemble – By Melissa Clark

Assessment has been an area that I have learned a lot on and how to incorporate it into a music ensemble. Being able to explore new technology tools and being able to apply it to assessment can help music educators in their ensembles. Throughout the presentation, you will learn about video chats, SmartMusic, Google products, Google classroom, practice charts, recap that, websites, and noteflight. Each of these technology tools can enhance student engagement and allow the teachers to better assess each individual student. I suggest taking time to use a new tech tools a few times during the year will help music educators.

Sponsored Sessions

Recorders!! From Beginners to Intermediate! – By Cak Marshall & Donna Kagan

Play through a variety of pieces from beginning to intermediate, while incorporating Orff, percussion, movement, scarf technique and poetry. Take ideas with you for your next school program! Be prepared to have fun!

Sponsored Sessions

Modern Band, Part 2: Keyboards – By Scott Burstein

Part two of this six session workshops centered around the belief that all people are musical, demonstrated by leveraging the musical choices of the individual. This is achieved through the performance of modern band music – culturally relevant music of students taught through approximation, music acquisition theory, and social equity. Participants will learn the basics of keyboard skills for popular musicians, with a focus on reading iconographic notation, utilizing improvisation, and demonstrate how all people are musical and can enjoy playing through familiar repertoire. Participation at session one is not mandatory, but encouraged.

 

Monday, November 13th 1:00 PM

Orchestra Directors’ Ensemble (2 hours and 15 minutes)

Orchestra Directors Ensemble – By Christopher Selby

Orchestra directors from across the country will come together to learn and perform in the 2017 Orchestra Directors’ Ensemble under the direction of Christopher Selby. During this unique experience, music educators will be exposed to rehearsal techniques, effective conducting, a wide variety of literature, warm-ups and ensemble development tactics. Don’t miss this opportunity to perform on the national stage.

General Interest (3-hour workshop)

Advocacy in Action: Advancing Music Education – By Scott Sheehan & Chris Woodside

Given the current political landscape, every music educator must be an advocate now more than ever! During this workshop teachers will create a successful grassroots advocacy plan to ensure that ALL students have access to a quality music education by examining ways to tap into NAfME’s resources and capitalize on music’s importance in the ESSA legislation. Participants will complete an “advocacy inventory” of their own teaching situations and will engage in rich discussion about the issues surrounding the path forward for music education.

General Interest (3-hour workshop)

Inclusivity in Action: Honoring LGBTQ Music Students – By Stephen A. Paparo, Josh Palkki, Russ Sperling, Mari Valverde

While the creation of safe spaces is vital for LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/questioning) students, more can be done to value, honor, and respect their identities. In this extended workshop, the presenters will suggest how music educators can become “safe people” by providing research-based findings regarding LGBTQ perspectives on music teaching and learning as well as practical strategies for repertoire selection, rehearsal processes, and teaching information about composers, lyricists, and texts. The music classroom can be a place in which students–regardless of their gender and sexual identities–can express themselves in a way that enriches music education for all.

General Music (3-hour workshop)

I don’t know anything about popular music! How (why) can I teach it? – By Emily Cleghorn & Maud Hickey

It feels overwhelming to try to keep up with the latest music that our students listen to. Yet it is imperative that students know we do care about what they listen to by incorporating popular music in our curriculum. This crucial task honors the diversity of both students and musics in our classroom. In this workshop, we will demonstrate how music educators don’t have to keep up because of the musical skills already developed. In addition to sharing sample lessons, participants will have the opportunity to revise current unit/lesson plans, receive feedback about curriculum design, and practice mini teaching demonstrations.

Sponsored Sessions

Practice, Performance, and Assessment with MusicFirst – By James T. Frankel

In this session, Jim will discuss challenges that teachers are facing with assessment, performance preparation, and grading based on his own experience as well as the experience of the teachers in the session. He will then demonstrate the benefits of the MusicFirst Online Classroom and integrated software tools and explore how cloud-based technology can facilitate a more efficient music classroom. Teachers will see the Online Classroom, it’s functions, and capabilities from the perspective of a teacher creating assignments as well as a student completing their assignments. Teachers will be given login credentials to complete demo work on their own devices.

Sponsored Sessions

Putting It Together With Technology: From Rehearsal to Performance – By Gregg Ritchie

Whether you’re an elementary music educator or a high school choral director, we all believe performance is an important component to the learning process; giving our students a means for expression, an outlet to connect with one another. With the 21st Century student, we’re looking for new ways to connect and to set these learners up for success. This is where the Music Studio comes in, McGraw-Hill’s new digital platform to deliver a comprehensive Pre-K through 12 grade solution for your performance needs. Whether it’s small individual “modules”, general music, or Hal Leonard’s new Voices In Concert collection, McGraw-Hill brings you outstanding performance opportunities with the robust curriculum and digital tools to get you and your student there. From rehearsal to performance, we can take you and your students on a journey of learning and creating like no other. Free demo codes given to all attendees for immediate use!

Sponsored Sessions

Why should I teach folk dance? And how do I start? – By Missy Strong

Folk dancing in elementary and middle school allows students to demonstrate what they have learned about moving to the beat while developing musicality. They more intuitively understand form through authentic experience and can more effectively articulate what form is. In addition to providing connections to American history, folk dance instruction gives students opportunities for much-needed positive peer interaction. These highly musical interactions help students build etiquette skills while creating positive community with peers. But the overarching thing that folk dancing brings to the music classroom is fun! Learn how to introduce folk dance into your music classroom starting next week.

Sponsored Sessions

Your Elementary Choir Toolkit: Technique, Technology, and Transformation! – By Dan Monaco

Discover exciting new techniques for developing vocal independence in your students through a combination of solid pedagogy and the integration of engaging technology. Who says you can’t teach an old song with new tricks? Participants will unpack a variety of folk songs, partner songs, canons and more as they learn to target the variety of skill levels in an elementary choir and walk away with a printed Octavo and sample access to adaptable rehearsal tools they can use in their classroom right away from the engaging and educational world of QuaverMusic.com. Quaver Choral Resources equip Elementary Music Specialists to cover a vast breadth of musical concepts, vocal techniques, and transferable skills to take their singers into middle school and beyond!

TI:ME

Using Google Tools in ANY Music Classroom – By Lesley Schultz

Learn how Google’s free suite of tools can save you time and enhance your teaching practice. Create self-grading quizzes and rubrics, keep an instant inventory, provide better feedback to students, and enhance communications with all. Coordinate it all with Google Classroom. Bring your computers or tablets for this interactive session.

TI:ME

Music Workstations Made Easy – By IK MultiMedia

Want to have a workstation in your classroom to produce and create music? Come learn how to set up a workstation for students of any level!

Presto (1:00 PM – 1:25 PM)

Presto Discussion: 21st Century Learning in a Music Classroom – By Leyla Sanyer

Join NAfME’s National Executive Board Member, Leyla Sanyer, as they moderate a discussion on the topic of “21st Century Learning in a Music Classroom”. Our hope is for this conversation to provoke thoughtful reflection, facilitate professional connections and prompt future conversations. Come prepared to share your best practices, ideas, and brainstorm with your colleagues. This conversation will last for 25 minutes.

Presto (1:00 PM – 1:25 PM)

Presto Discussion: Integration of Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) – By John Combs

Join NAfME’s National Executive Board Member, John Combs, as they moderate a discussion on the topic of “Integration of Social and Emotional Learning (SEL)”. Our hope is for this conversation to provoke thoughtful reflection, facilitate professional connections and prompt future conversations. Come prepared to share your best practices, ideas, and brainstorm with your colleagues. This conversation will last for 25 minutes.

Presto (1:00 PM – 1:25 PM)

Presto Discussion: Book Club: Connecting with Other Music Teachers – By Kathleen Sanz

Join NAfME’s President-Elect, Kathleen Sanz, as they moderate a discussion on the topic of “Book Club: Connecting with Other Music Teachers”. Our hope is for this conversation to provoke thoughtful reflection, facilitate professional connections and prompt future conversations. Come prepared to share your best practices, ideas, and brainstorm with your colleagues. This conversation will last for 25 minutes.

Presto (1:35 PM – 2:00 PM)

Presto Discussion: Equity and Diversity Integration in Lesson Plans – By Leyla Sanyer

Join NAfME’s National Executive Board Member, Leyla Sanyer, as they moderate a discussion on the topic of “Equity and Diversity Integration in Lesson Plans”. Our hope is for this conversation to provoke thoughtful reflection, facilitate professional connections and prompt future conversations. Come prepared to share your best practices, ideas, and brainstorm with your colleagues. This conversation will last for 25 minutes.

Presto (1:35 PM – 2:00 PM)

Presto Discussion: Thinking Outside the Box: Innovative Ideas for the Music Classroom – By John Combs

Join NAfME’s National Executive Board Member, John Combs, as they moderate a discussion on the topic of “Thinking Outside the Box: Innovative Ideas for the Music Classroom”. Our hope is for this conversation to provoke thoughtful reflection, facilitate professional connections and prompt future conversations. Come prepared to share your best practices, ideas, and brainstorm with your colleagues. This conversation will last for 25 minutes.

Presto (1:35 PM – 2:00 PM)

Presto Discussion: Motivating and Developing Future Music Leaders/Teachers (Tri-M – Collegiate) – By Kathleen Sanz

Join NAfME’s President-Elect, Kathleen Sanz, as they moderate a discussion on the topic of “Motivating and developing future music leaders/teachers (Tri-M – Collegiate)”. Our hope is for this conversation to provoke thoughtful reflection, facilitate professional connections and prompt future conversations. Come prepared to share your best practices, ideas, and brainstorm with your colleagues. This conversation will last for 25 minutes.

Sponsored Sessions

Modern Band, Part 3 – Guitar – By Scott Burstien

Part three of this six session workshop is centered around the belief that all people are musical, demonstrated by leveraging the musical choices of the individual. This is achieved through the performance of modern band music – culturally relevant music of students taught through approximation, music acquisition theory, and social equity. Participants will learn basic guitar skills for popular musicians, with a focus on reading iconographic notation, utilizing improvisation, and demonstrating how all people are musical and can enjoy playing through familiar repertoire. Participation at previous sessions is not mandatory, but encouraged.

 

Monday, November 13th 2:15 PM

Band

“Why Doesn’t My Band Sound Better?”: Ten of the Most Common Mistakes Band Directors Make During Rehearsals – By David W. Snyder

Many band directors are frustrated by sub-par performances from their ensembles and mistakenly blame their students for these re-occurring problems. This clinic will present 10 common mistakes that directors make during rehearsal and some possible solutions for correcting them.

Jazz

Beginning Improvisation: A Melodic Approach – By Kevin Woods

For educators who don’t have much experience improvising or teaching improvisation, we will focus on using melody as a springboard for ideas to get young musicians improvising right away. Methods will be explored that cater to visual and aural learners. The techniques are easy to learn and teach, and help take the fear out of improvising. Please feel free to bring instruments.

General Interest

Life, Music, and Social Justice for All – By Rachael Fleischaker

Explore social justice through hands-on activities that challenge traditional styles of classroom management, interactions with colleagues, and involvement in community partnerships. This session was developed with the urban music teacher in mind, but the activities and information that will be shared is appropriate for any music teacher, at any experience level, and in any school setting. Participants will identify and explore conceptions and misconceptions of social justice by using props, stories, metaphor, word play, games, and discussion.

Sponsored Sessions

Experience the Future of Music Rehearsal – By Denny Meyer

Learn how the future of music education is changing. Listen to “real-life” examples of how virtual acoustic technology can make your rehearsals more productive and life-changing for your students. Transport your students from a recital hall to YOUR performance venue at the push of a button. And, see how your performances will “come to life” with this remarkable technology.

Sponsored Sessions

Financial Planning for the Music Educator – By Michael Kamphuis

There are four pillars to fiscally running an instrumental music program: recruitment and retention, asset management, budgeting and advocacy/justification. Discover ways to connect these areas together to run a financially sustainable program. In addition, learn new ways to communicate to your administration so they have a clearer understanding of your needs.

Sponsored Sessions

QuaverMusic.com DEMO: Search Tips & Tricks – By Dan Monaco

In the Quaver Library teachers can search through their collection of over 6,500 teaching resources, using keywords and filters to find lesson screens, printables, songs, and audio files to use right away or save in a Folder for a later time. Come explore this powerful functionality for yourself to see all that’s waiting in Quaver’s library – and pick up a few tips and tricks for easier searching along the way!

TI:ME

Top Tech Tools Under $300 – By Romeo Music

Come check out the latest and greatest tech tools for you and your classroom!

TI:ME

How to use Shedthemusic.com as an enrichment and remediation tool for schools that are 1:1 with technology. – By Bob Habersat

Shedthemusic.com is a free music education resource that was developed by two high school teachers. The content was created to supplement daily instruction in the general music and performance ensemble setting.. Materials are presented through concise documents and videos that are optimized for tablets and smartphones. This presentation will show you how to make The Shed work for you.

Sponsored Sessions

Modern Band, Part 4 – Bass, Vocals, and Drums – By Scott Burstein

Part four of this six session workshop is centered around the belief that all people are musical, demonstrated by leveraging the musical choices of the individual. This is achieved through the performance of modern band music – culturally relevant music of students taught through approximation, music acquisition theory, and social equity. Participants will learn basic skills on bass, vocals, and drums, with a focus on iconographic notation, and demonstrating how all people are musical and can enjoy playing through familiar repertoire. Participation at previous sessions is not mandatory, but encouraged.

 

Monday, November 13th 3:30 PM

Choir Directors’ Ensemble (2 hours and 15 minutes)

Choir Directors’ Ensemble – By Jo-Michael Scheibe

Composer and Conductor, Jo-Michael Scheibe will lead you and your fellow choir director colleagues through efficient rehearsal techniques, effective conducting, a wide variety of standard and new literature, warm-ups and ensemble development tactics during the second annual Choir Directors’ Ensemble.

Band

Motivating and Preparing Students to be Effective Practicers – By Natalie Royston

Individual practice is essential for students to gain skills and grow in musicianship. Using a practical and developmental approach, Royston will discuss the importance of teaching students how to practice and suggest ways the teacher can address some of these strategies in the classroom. This clinic will be presented with many ideas and resources that will be able to be adapted and implemented immediately by the instrumental music teacher at any level. The session will include motivating students to practice, creating goal-based practice charts, utilizing effective practice activities and strategies, organization and time-management of the practice session, self-reflection, and assessment.

General Interest

Battling Burnout: Actions You Can Take Today to Ensure You’ll Still Love Teaching Tomorrow – By Elisa Jones

Have you read some of those ‘venting’ posts on social media all about how your fellow teachers have ‘had it’ or ‘get no respect’ or are ‘so frustrated’ and just cringed? Or maybe you have felt the same way- wondering why you got into music education at all? In this session we’ll talk about the most common issues music educators face once entering the workplace, and some of the strategies you can use to ensure not only will you be able to better manage the rigors of teaching, but still be entering your classroom with a skip in your step 20 years from now.

General Interest

Evaluation Evidence: What the Music Teacher Can Do to Deliberately Document the Domains of Danielson – By Don Stinson

You’re a great teacher – now show them why! Evaluations can be a time consuming and sometimes stressful part of both the evaluator and teacher’s professional life. Federal, state, county, and school requirements can make the evaluation process seem cumbersome, and in some instances, worrisome to the teacher being evaluated. This session dissects the evaluation process with the music teacher in mind. Methods for communicating and providing evidence for the music teacher evaluation will be covered, and tips and techniques are supplied to ensure that your evaluation is completed and documented in the best possible way.

Sponsored Sessions

Higher-Order Thinking! – John Jacobson

It’s as Simple as Do Re Mi. Giving young students the tools they need to infer, understand, connect, categorize, evaluate, and apply the information they learn will help them become the leaders and learners, teachers, and problem-solvers of the future. Where else can they get those tools more effectively than in our music class? In this fun and educational clinic, learn more about the role you play.

Sponsored Sessions

Title I Decoded: How little details can mean big money for YOUR music program – By Catherine Dwinal

The world of Elementary Music Education is about to change nationwide, with the funding of Title I (and Title IV, etc.) for the Arts! A portion of this substantial grant funding MUST now be applied to your Music Program…but only if you ask the right questions to your district! This Session will equip your music program with the specific language samples and tactics needed to claim your share and support your music program for years to come!

TI:ME

Band, Orchestra, and Choral Students Will Flip for Theory – By Marjorie LoPresti

Every musician needs a solid foundation in music theory. Basic piano skills are an asset for a lifetime of music making. This session will provide easy, practical strategies to include theory and piano in your choral, band, orchestra, and general programs. Technology-supported learning and practice can enable you to make the most of instructional and rehearsal time with minimal prep and planning.

TI:ME

Personalize Your Elementary Music Classroom – By Megan Endicott

See what all the fuss is about with personalized learning and how music teachers can enhance the traditional classroom model. Learn how to use a variety of teaching strategies that incorporate best practices, assessments, and how to seamlessly integrate technology while providing your students with a customized learning environment.

Sponsored Sessions

Modern Band, Part 5 – Composition – By Scott Burstein

Part five of this six session workshop is centered around the belief that all people are musical, demonstrated by leveraging the musical choices of the individual. This is achieved through the performance of modern band music – culturally relevant music of students taught through approximation, music acquisition theory, and social equity. Participants will learn the basics of group song composition for the classroom, form bands, compose, and perform a song. Participation at previous sessions is not mandatory, but encouraged.

 

Monday, November 13th 4:45 PM

Band

Achieving Success In The Small (rural) School – By Stanley Johnson

Will be discussing ways to achieve a successful music program, especially in the small (rural) schools. Present a positive attitude to the students and do not let the size of the group affect the positive things that we can accomplish. Creating enthusiasm, and excitement for the students and the program, and discussing the challenges one faces, including Administrators, Booster (parent) groups, developing a budget and funding of the program, developing a workable curriculum, and achieving good classroom management. Making the music program, a vital one that the school and community will support and be proud of, and show the community the life long advantages students can obtain from being in a good music program. Take care of yourself–by balancing your Professional and Personal life–Work as Hard as you Play and Play as Hard as you Work. Remember teaching music can be an incredible fun and rewarding career, and it is the Quality and not the Quantity that brings success for the end result. A Small School is not an Excuse for Mediocrity and always Prioritize What You Do.

Collegiate

Surviving the Gauntlet: How to Make it Through Your First 3 Years – By Matthew Williams

Researchers have demonstrated that teachers are most likely to leave the profession during the first three to five years of teaching. While reasons may vary, the negative impact on schools, students, and the profession is clear. In this session, participants will discuss the biggest reasons that music teachers leave the field and come away with practical tips to stay engaged and motivated as music educators.

Composition

Composition in Choral and Instrumental Ensembles – By Rob Deemer & Alexander Koops

In the 2014 National Music Standards, creating has been elevated to one of three artistic processes, making the creative activity of composing more essential and relevant than ever! Many in the profession, however, are unsure of how best to implement the creating process components of imagine, plan and make, evaluate and refine, and present. Examples of student work within each of these process components will be presented, along with music composition teaching strategies and lesson ideas. Participants in this hands-on session will interact with these process components individually and as a whole. The focus of this session will be on how to implement the creating process through composition in choral and instrumental ensembles.

General Music

Promoting Equity, Community, and Culture with Music – By Alison M. Reynolds & Diana R. Dansereau

In this session, join in innovative, dynamic, and developmentally appropriate music engagement activities that positively promote equity, community, and varied aspects young musician’s culture in the early childhood or general music classroom. Discover ways the PK-3rd-grade examples designed for all learners connect to research findings and support National Core Arts Standards, and apply the content to your current teaching practices.

Jazz

How to Write and Teach Jazz Bass Lines – By Megan Cleary

Do you have a jazz student who is new to playing the bass and the parts are too hard? Do you compose for jazz band and want to write a good bass line? Do you want to write more complicated parts for your advanced bassists? Come and learn two different ways of fingering for bassists, how fingering affects jazz bass lines, hand patterns that fit on any chord in any position, and other things to consider when writing jazz bass lines.

Orchestral

Is Your Method Book Working? How to Improve Instrumental Music Literacy – By Nathaniel Strick

Music is a language. It is part of what makes us human. Like language literacy, musicians must be able to “hear what is seen and see what is heard”. Unfortunately, most method books fall short in achieving true music literacy for every student. This session will introduce you to a literacy sequence that will improve musicanship, reduce achievement gaps, promote creativity, and energize your program.

Sponsored Sessions

Repertoire Selection, Practice and Sight-Reading Made Easy with the New SmartMusic – By Giovanna Cruz

The New SmartMusic is a web-based platform that continues the tradition of our classic product while expanding access and reducing price. Come discover the immense library of titles available in the platform and how to improve your ensemble & student’s performance by practicing with accompaniment, repetition loops, music on screen and immediate feedback. Instant sight-reading will let you and your students know where they are and what they need to do to improve

Sponsored Sessions

QuaverMusic.com DEMO: Lesson Customization – By Catherine Dwinal

With drag-and-drop technology and options to import outside resources, Quaver’s Resource Manager makes it easy for teachers to customize their curriculum resources to meet their needs. Quaver trainers are standing by to help you customize a lesson – maybe for the first time! Drop in to see this powerful functionality in action.

TI:ME

Digital Time Management for the Music Teacher – By Robby Burns

Teachers spend too much time staring at computer screens checking email, scrambling to complete logistic tasks, and organizing documents. Technology is supposed to help us get work done, but often it is just one other thing in our way. Learn to harness the power of task management, calendar, and other productivity apps so that you can spend less time doing busywork and more time teaching music!

TI:ME

Compose and Record with Every Student! – By Noteflight

Noteflight Learn is the ideal platform for composing and recording music, and includes hundreds of musical scores for assignments and assessments. This session will provide a detailed overview of how to create assignments for composition and recording, and demonstrate the integration with Google Classroom.

Sponsored Sessions

Something New for Monday’s Class – By Cak Marshall & Donna Kagan

Have you ever finished a lesson or rehearsal early, then needed a quick five minute project to use your time wisely? Experiment and explore several ways to make use of those extra minutes! Turn one of these ideas into an extended lesson. Lot’s of laughter, fun, movement, and prizes to hand out in this session.

Sponsored Sessions

Modern Band, Part 6 – Music as a Second Language – By Scott Burstein

The conclusion of this six session workshop takes a deep dive into the concept of learning Music as a Second Language. This session will focus on a unique approach to teaching music: Music as a Second Language. MSL is a pedagogy that is based off of Steven Krashen’s Second Language Acquisition methodology, modified by David Wish and incorporating ideas from Suzuki, Orff, Gordon, Dr. Seuss, and the Beatles. The focus is on not learning music, but acquiring it as we do with language through the core values of student-centered repertoire, approximation, creating a comfort zone, scaffolding, composition, and improvisation.

 

Tuesday, November 14th 8:00 AM

Band Directors’ Ensemble (1 hour and 45 minutes)

Band Directors’ Ensemble – Peter Boonshaft

These sessions will allow band directors to develop and experience rehearsal technique, effective conducting, new repertoire, standard literature, warm-ups and how to develop ensemble concepts, with the goal of creating even better rehearsals. The Band Directors’ Ensemble will perform on the conference stage to close the conference. Don’t miss this opportunity to learn and perform with Peter Boonshaft.

Choral

Building Numbers and Diversity into your Middle School Vocal Music Program – By Marci Malone DeAmbrose

This session will provide a model that will attract a more diverse and inclusive vocal music experience in middle school. This semester long class will not only focus on skills students need to make music at another level, but it will also inspire students to create, such as vocal improvisation through Hip-Hop music, and to respond to music as well, such as blogging about music heard inside and outside the classroom. Through these course requirements, students can explore individual interests and enjoy group singing. The model has been developed to accommodate students with a variety of vocal interests and all levels of student learning.

General Music

Storybooks and Children’s Literature: Finding the Music Within – By Suzanne Hall

The use of storybooks in the elementary music classroom not only promotes imaginative play but can also serve as a vehicle to engage students in music learning. Additionally, students garner a deeper level of comprehension of both the text and music when bringing storybooks to life. This session will demonstrate mini lessons that use storybooks to teach music concepts and discuss the right storybook for the most optimum musical experience. Finally, the session will give participants a step by step process on how to guide students in developing a musical representation of their favorite chapter book.

Guitar

Instilling a “Can Do” Attitude in the High School Guitar Classroom – By Andrew Pfaff

Teaching beginning guitar (or any instrument) to musically inexperienced 11th and 12th graders is a worthy mission with unique challenges. Students’ beliefs about their musical abilities can have a profound impact on their potential for success in the music classroom.

If these students view their ability as a fixed circumstance, they are much more prone to give up and say, “I can’t.” This presentation will demonstrate techniques, based in Bandura’s social cognitive theory, for gathering and acting on data which can influence students to be more likely to attribute ability to effort and say, “I can!”

Non-traditional Ensembles

Ensembles for Everyone: Non-tradional Ensembles Rock! – By Jessica Mathias and Kristine Gervais

Do you want to reach more students? Do you need ideas to engage the kids who believe they are “not good at music?” Would you like examples and resources you can implement in your existing program or use to develop new ensembles. Join in as we explore multiple options for non-traditional ensembles, discuss the need for more musical choices in schools, participate in mini-lessons, and take home lesson plans, arrangements, and other resources that can be used in your own classroom. Ensembles include World Music, “Singing Strings” (guitar/ukulele ensembles), Modern/Rock Band, and “Street Percussion” (found percussion, bucket drumming, performance percussion).

Orchestral

You Want Me To Do What? Tips for String Teachers When Communicating with Winds, Brass and Percussion – By Michael R. Gagliardo

Have you ever wanted to expand your string orchestra into a full orchestra? Are you concerned about venturing into unfamiliar territory – in particular, the woodwind, brass and percussion sections? Stop worrying – you’ve got this! This session will provide you with tips, techniques, and teaching tools for working with students to achieve the best results with your full orchestra. Topics covered include instrumentation, ensemble set-up, repertoire selection, general issues including tuning and transpositions, and specific techniques including breathing, phrasing, articulations, sound, and expression. Learn what to ask for, and how to ask for it, in creating your full orchestra experience!

General Interest

Mindset & Grit: Keys to Successful Performances – By Paul G. Young

Learn how music classrooms are ideal environments to increase students’ grit, growth mindset, and motivation – skills will soon be assessed as part of ESSA requirements. Attendees will learn how to model and teach growth mindset and grit traits and discover how perseverance strategies increase academic performance and lead to higher retention rates in music programs. Interactive discussions will spark interest, generate greater awareness of the importance of social-emotional skills, demonstrate applicability for both students and teachers, and advocate the development of noncognitive skill teaching strategies throughout all facets of music instruction.

Sponsored Sessions

Let’s Talk (Barber)shop – By Kim Newcomb

A cappella harmony in the barbershop style has a true “ring” – and is one of the most American of musical art forms. If you’re a little unfamiliar with the genre – or tend to think it’s “old school” – this class is for you! Four young, passionate barbershoppers will share their perspectives on the pure beauty and challenge of close harmony, its value in shaping young voices and how it reinforces the sheer joy of making music with others. Barbershop may be just the fresh, fun challenge you’re seeking for your students!

Sponsored Sessions

The World is Your Oyster! Building Cross-Curricular Connections through Folk Music and Movement – By Graham Hepburn

Music is truly a universal language; one that can take students on a tour of the globe from the comfort of your music classroom. In this session, we’ll explore folk songs from cultures around the world, using movement, instruments, improvisation, and technology to extract solid cross-curricular connections in geography, history, and language – all while meeting your general music objectives. Participants will walk away with activities they can implement right away to create lessons that connect every corner of the school campus, and beyond!

TI:ME

Make an Instrument with Makey Makeys – By Joshua Emanuel

With Makey Makeys, connect everyday objects to your computer. Apply engineering and construction principles to your music class by connecting conductive materials to create sound. In this session, participants will use MakeyMakeys and various conductive materials to create and play instruments. Examples of student work will also be shown to demonstrate the use of MakeyMakeys in the classroom. Participants are encouraged to bring their own laptops.

TI:ME

Ideas for Technology Use in YOUR Music Classroom – By Laura Blake

This session will explore uses for technology in the music classroom, providing participants with tech tools that can be successfully used in a variety of areas, including assessment, communication, creativity, content creation, teacher productivity, and more. The emphasis will be on selecting technology that enhances creativity, encourages students to play music longer and with greater focus – not merely using tech for the sake of using tech.

Sponsored Sessions

Whokulele? YOUkulele! Ukulele Made Easy – By Lavonna Zeller-Williams-Bratschi

Never played the ukulele before? Looking for an easily accessible instrument to teach to your students? Ukulele is gaining popularity with the younger generation since many popular songs featuring the instrument are songs that kids want to learn. You too can pick it up and play within minutes. Students will be so thankful you’ve taught them to play and you will thank yourself too!

Sponsored Sessions

Visible, Viable, Valuable – By Jennifer Brooks-Muller

Strategies for Instrumental Music Programs in low income schools

Sponsored Sessions

iPad as Instrument in Modern Band Class – By Spencer Hale

Participants will explore the Garageband app on iPads as a tool for differentiating and teaching music performance using electronic instruments. The session will focus on performance in a Modern Band setting. Though participants will primarily be using Garageband, other iPad apps and features will be provided as suggestions for further use. Some iPads will be available for use, but it is recommended that participants bring their own. The app is similar to the iPhone Garageband app, which could be used as well.

 

Tuesday, November 14th 9:15 AM

Choral

Unveiling the Mystery: Understanding Arabic Choral Music for the Western Choral Conductor – By Cari Earnhart

East meets West as we explore the accessibility of Arabic Choral music for the Western Choral conductor. In order for conductors to effectively teach, conduct, and perform these works, it is important to develop a basic understanding of traditional Arabic musical styles and pronunciation of the language, thereby making Arabic choral music more accessible and enabling it to become a part of the world’s larger musical vocabulary. This session serves as an introductory resource for non-Arab choral conductors concerning key elements related to performing Arabic choral music and a context for how these elements relate to this evolving choral genre.

Collegiate

edTPA and Other Teacher Certification Tests: Helpful Hints – By Ann M. Deisler

This session will provide a brief overview of the edTPA portfolio (teacher performance assessment) teacher certification portfolio and other standard certification tests expected of teacher candidates nationwide. The process is daunting, especially as it happens during the student teacher residency. In this session I will share interviews and data from my students’ experiences and helpful hints on decoding the language of edTPA, the main objectives of each of the three assessment areas and practical advice on obtaining a successful outcome. I will also discuss standard statewide certification tests and how to best be prepared for these.

General Music

From Raga to Gaga: Integrating World Musics into the Western Secondary General Music Classroom – By Natalie Sheeler

Do you wish you knew more about world musics? Are you unsure how to integrate non-Western musics into your curriculum in a way that engages your students? If you answered yes to these questions, then this session is for you! In this workshop, comparisons will be drawn to connect musical features of Western art and popular musics to World musics. Could South African responsorial singing be compared to The Rolling Stones? What musical features do Adele and Peking opera share? These questions and more will be answered while sharing resources and hands-on sample activities for your classroom.

Orchestral

DIY Music-Making: Teaching Students How To Arrange From Scratch – By Taylor Morris

As the number of string musicians who post covers of pop tunes on YouTube continues to grow, there has never been a better time for engaging students through contemporary music. You could tap into this trend by encouraging your students to buy sheet music – or, better yet, you could foster their musical autonomy by teaching them how to create their own arrangements with their friends! Join violinist, fiddler, and educator Taylor Morris as he shares tried-and-true methods for breaking down the complex concept of arranging into a simple approach that teaches music theory while empowering students. Bring your instrument!

General Interest

The Elephant in the Room: Race Conversations in Our Classrooms – By Jane M. Kuehne

Our classrooms are full of vibrant and diverse students from many different familial and cultural backgrounds. When faced with cultural and race issues in our classrooms, from innocent kindergartner questions to more serious and potentially damaging adolescent actions and words, we may feel uncomfortable talking about them with our students or school communities. This session will include a short overview of the clinician’s views on Critical Race Theory, with focused discussion and activities designed to find respectful and educational ways to address these innocent and serious questions and actions in our classrooms and school communities.

Students with Differences/Disabilities

Braille Music Notation: How can we facilitate musical literacy for visually impaired students – By Stacie Lee Rossow

Musical literacy is for students all students, including the visually impaired. These students should be given the tools to learn to read and understand music just as their sighted peers. This session will present the real-world challenges and successes encountered in working with visually impaired students in the music program.

Sponsored Sessions

CHROMEBOOKS, We’ve Got You Covered! – By James T. Frankel

As technology has become an integral part of our lives, it is no surprise it has also become an integral part of education. Often unaffordable and tricky to understand, finding technology that works is a challenge many music teachers face. The MusicFirst Online Classroom was developed to address these challenges! Fully functional on Chromebooks, our award-winning learning management system eases organization and assessment, allowing teachers to connect students directly to their assignments. The Online Classroom and optional software tools all work on iOS devices, so no matter what technology you have available, MusicFirst will always be at your fingertips.

Sponsored Sessions

QuaverMusic.com DEMO: Interactive Games PLUS Your Chance Meet Quaver – By Graham Hepburn

Teachers are invited to visit the Quaver booth for a photo or video with Quaver AND a hands-on demonstration of some of Quaver’s favorite interactive games for your music classroom. Come anytime for a chance to ask questions, try new resources, get your photo op with Quaver, and maybe win a prize!

TI:ME

Turbocharge Student Practice and Results with SmartMusic – By MakeMusic

In this clinic, we will discuss motivation theory and practice techniques including Mindset, Willpower, Flow and Deliberate Practice as they apply to building a culture of practice with your students. Then we will demonstrate how to put the concepts of practice to the test using SmartMusic as a deliberate practice tool.

TI:ME

The Single Sound Project: Unconventional Composition in the Digital Age – By Clive Davis

Sponsored Sessions

Get Engaged! Powerful PTA ArtsEd Programs for School Success – By Ethan Clark

Whether you’re new to family and community engagement or an experienced leader, the PTA ArtsEd Toolkit will help you establish support for school improvements. In this session you will explore national program resources to help you partner with PTA and accomplish one or more of the following: Increase student access to ArtsEd opportunities; Secure ArtsEd resources for students and teachers; Strengthen family and community relationships with schools; Establish School ArtsEd Policies.

Sponsored Sessions

In Tune With Timpani: Tuning and Sound Concepts – By Bill Shaltis

Having a good ear is a must for timpanists, yet many young percussionists find themselves lost when it comes to tuning timpani without the aid of a gauge or noisy external source like a pitch pipe or glockenspiel. This clinic will provide a comprehensive approach to ear training with the student percussionist in mind. Topics will include learning intervals in order of importance, sight singing, integrating smartphone apps and software, learning the ranges of timpani, and other important tuning concepts. Also covered are thoughts on basic sound production and tone color to produce the right sound for the right moment!

Sponsored Sessions

Teaching Guitar for the non-guitarists – By Scott Burstein

Do you want to teach a guitar class, yet struggle finding curriculum, lesson plans, and resources? This workshop is designed for the beginning guitarist who is looking to develop the skills, musical language, and repertoire to feel comfortable running a guitar program. This can be achieved through the use of culturally relevant music of students taught through approximation, music acquisition theory, and social equity. Participants will learn basic guitar skills for popular musicians, with a focus on reading iconographic notation, utilizing improvisation, and demonstrating how all people are musical and can enjoy playing through familiar repertoire.

 

Tuesday, November 14th 1:00 PM

Orchestra Directors’ Ensemble (2 hours and 15 minutes)

Orchestra Directors Ensemble – By Christopher Selby

Orchestra directors from across the country will come together to learn and perform in the 2017 Orchestra Directors’ Ensemble under the direction of Christopher Selby. During this unique experience, music educators will be exposed to rehearsal techniques, effective conducting, a wide variety of literature, warm-ups and ensemble development tactics.

General Music (3-hour workshop)

ESL and Music: Cross-Curricular Learning through Imaginative Play – By Katy Strand

Language learning joins with musical creativity! In this hands-on session we will explore three different ESL teaching tools for their use in both language and musical learning: total physical response (TPR), air-planning, and language experience approach (LEA). Each of these teaching tools gives us fresh opportunities to help our students develop musical understandings, skill, and explore the intersections between music and language. Bring your expressive selves and plan to have a great experience!

General Interest (3-hour workshop)

Putting it All Together – Standards and Assessment at the District Level – By Denese Odegaard

Do you ever wonder how to implement the standards in your own district? This workshop will take you through the step by step process of writing a district standards-based curriculum, lesson plans, assessments for student growth, and more! This work is based on a school district’s plan and will cover tips for engaging the whole music staff on this project which results in more buy-in! Free templates will be offered and time embedded into the workshop to create a district plan for your district.

Choral (3-hour workshop)

Gospel Music Sing-Along – Learn-Along – By Donna M. Cox

Gospel Music: Sing-Along-Learn-Along takes an experiential approach to unlocking the historical, cultural and musical significance of gospel music. During the workshop, participants will learn a variety of gospel songs, using the aural/oral tradition and assisted by members of the demonstration choir. Three specific skills, interpreting the written score, conducting gospel music and improvisation, will be threaded throughout. The workshop concludes with a mini-concert in which participants, divided into two choirs, perform selections from the workshop repertoire for each other. Participants will take leadership roles in conducting, singing lead solos and accompanying.

Sponsored

Creating broad based advocacy through the development of dynamic business/community partnerships! – David Branson

This session will present and discuss as a group ideas for developing dynamic and lasting partnerships with local and state businesses that can greatly enhance the educational and musical opportunities for your students. In addition; we will discuss how these partnerships develop powerful and highly engaged advocates for your program!

Sponsored

QuaverMusic.com DEMO: Lesson Customization – By Catherine Dwinal

With drag-and-drop technology and options to import outside resources, Quaver’s Resource Manager makes it easy for teachers to customize their curriculum resources to meet their needs. Quaver trainers are standing by to help you customize a lesson – maybe for the first time! Drop in to see this powerful functionality in action.

Sponsored (1:00 PM – 4:30 PM)

How to incorporate technology in the music classroom – Nadine Levitt

A demo of WURRLYedu: A simple and comprehensive toolbox for music teachers that enables true experiential learning with an emotional hook that makes lessons more relatable for students. Teachers will see the program through the eyes of a student. Get your pipes ready because you will be singing with us!

TI:ME

Easy, Effective Technology Strategies for Band – By Brittany Hassler

This session offers Band directors the resources and strategies in which to use technology as a supplemental teaching tool. Many educators are interested in using technology in all of their music classes but are unsure how to incorporate it in the instrumental setting. We will discuss web-based applications, apps, and assessment tools and how to use them in a way that’s easy, organized and enhances teaching instrumental skills.

TI:ME

The Single Sound Project: Unconventional Composition in the Digital Age – By Clive Davis

Presto (1:00 PM – 1:25 PM)

Presto Discussion: Developing a positive and safe culture in the music classroom – By Marc Green

Join NAfME’s National Executive Board Member, Marc Green, as they moderate a discussion on the topic of “Developing a positive and safe culture in the music classroom”. Our hope is for this conversation to provoke thoughtful reflection, facilitate professional connections and prompt future conversations. Come prepared to share your best practices, ideas, and brainstorm with your colleagues. This conversation will last for 25 minutes.

Presto (1:00 PM – 1:25 PM)

Presto Discussion: Connecting with Community: Parents, Business Partners, and More – By Mike Blakeslee

Join NAfME’s Executive Director and CEO, Mike Blakeslee, as they moderate a discussion on the topic of “Connecting with Community: Parents, Business Partners, and More”. Our hope is for this conversation to provoke thoughtful reflection, facilitate professional connections and prompt future conversations. Come prepared to share your best practices, ideas, and brainstorm with your colleagues. This conversation will last for 25 minutes.

Presto (1:00 PM – 1:25 PM)

Presto Discussion: Assessment – Portfolio Development (secondary v. elementary) – By Glenn Nierman

Join NAfME’s Immediate Past-President, Glenn Nierman, as they moderate a discussion on the topic of “Assessment – Portfolio Development (secondary v. elementary)”. Our hope is for this conversation to provoke thoughtful reflection, facilitate professional connections and prompt future conversations. Come prepared to share your best practices, ideas, and brainstorm with your colleagues. This conversation will last for 25 minutes.

Presto (1:35 PM – 2:00 PM)

Presto Discussion: Classroom Management in the Music Classroom – By Marc Green

Join NAfME’s National Executive Board Member, Marc Green, as they moderate a discussion on the topic of “Classroom Management in the Music Classroom”. Our hope is for this conversation to provoke thoughtful reflection, facilitate professional connections and prompt future conversations. Come prepared to share your best practices, ideas, and brainstorm with your colleagues. This conversation will last for 25 minutes.

Presto (1:35 PM – 2:00 PM)

Presto Discussion: Using Advocacy to Promote What You Do – By Mike Blakeslee

Join NAfME’s Executive Director and CEO, Mike Blakeslee, as they moderate a discussion on the topic of “Using Advocacy to Promote What You Do”. Our hope is for this conversation to provoke thoughtful reflection, facilitate professional connections and prompt future conversations. Come prepared to share your best practices, ideas, and brainstorm with your colleagues. This conversation will last for 25 minutes.

Presto (1:35 PM – 2:00 PM)

Presto Discussion: Support Beyond High School: Helping H.S. Musicians Apply for Scholarships – By Glenn Nierman

Join NAfME’s Immediate Past-President, Glenn Nierman, as they moderate a discussion on the topic of “Support Beyond High School: Helping H.S. Musicians Apply for Scholarships”. Our hope is for this conversation to provoke thoughtful reflection, facilitate professional connections and prompt future conversations. Come prepared to share your best practices, ideas, and brainstorm with your colleagues. This conversation will last for 25 minutes.

Sponsored Sessions

Bringing Keyboards in the Classroom to Your School – By Mark Linn

If you’ve always wanted to start a group piano program at your school, this is the session for you. Classroom music teachers can create more music-makers at their school and complement existing band, orchestra and choir programs. Not only are group keyboard classes a fun and enriching activity, but college-bound students who aspire to become band and orchestra directors will get a head start on learning the keyboard skills that will be required to earn their music education degree. And adding group piano as a classroom option will strengthen your job position by adding more students to your teaching load.

Sponsored Sessions

Using Guided Listening to Spark Curiosity and Creativity – By Mary Claxton

Consuming music through streaming services, television and social media is a huge part of young peoples’ life experience. Much of it, however, is a passive experience. This session will explore how educators can spark more curious and creative thoughts surrounding that listening. Materials and methods for guided listening will be provided along with conversations about both the musical and social ramifications of the listening experience.

 

Tuesday, November 14th 2:15 PM

Band

Establishing a Beginning Band Program: Tools for Success – By Sharen W. Bolder

The purpose of this session is to inspire and support new directors in their first years of teaching, by providing tips that may not have been acquired in college. The session will provide information about realistic expectations, syllabi and course expectations, curriculum mapping, instructional strategies and approaches that have worked, and a list of resources. To help establish, nurture, and sustain a beginning band program, recommendations are made for administrative requirements and best practices that serve students and directors.

Composition

Composition in Guitar, Keyboard, and Technology Classes; and in Non-Traditional Ensembles – Clint Randles

In the 2014 National Music Standards, creating has been elevated to one of three artistic processes, making the creative activity of composing more essential and relevant than ever! Many in the profession, however, are unsure of how best to implement the creating process components of imagine, plan and make, evaluate and refine, and present. Examples of student work within each of these process components will be presented, along with music composition teaching strategies and lesson ideas. Participants in this hands-on session will interact with these process components individually and as a whole. The focus of this session will be on how to implement the creating process through composition guitar, keyboard, and technology classes; and in non-traditional ensembles.

Higher Education

Field Experience Immersion in Music: A Model for Cultural Diversity through Field Experience – By Kathleen Melago & Jonathan Helmick

To expand our students’ experience with diversity and broaden our students’ consideration of other regions for employment, we created a course, Field Experience Immersion in Music, designed to include field experience activities while immersed in the culture of a different population. In January 2015 and 2017, this course was taught in Santa Fe, New Mexico. This session will endeavor to inspire and guide faculty at other institutions to create similar experiences and for K-12 schools to consider such partnerships. We will include the timeline for preparation, syllabus and course materials, planning tips, outcomes, and share student impact of the course.

Sponsored

Projects for Every Process: Encouraging Students to Create, Perform, Respond AND Connect – By Graham Hepburn

Create Perform, Respond, and Connect are the foundation of any music class. Creating simple projects that can be assessed in these four artistic processes can be challenging and time consuming. This workshop will demonstrate great project ideas that are, fun, time saving and easy to assess. Get a head start on this week’s lesson planning with tangible tips and sample access to resources you can use right away!

TI:ME

EDTECH IN THE BANDROOM? Effective and practical ways to implement technology in the bandroom. – By Stephen Keys

With the development of new technologies, band, orchestra,and choir teachers can implement technology to engage and enhance student learning and improve rehearsal efficiency.

TI:ME

My School is 1:1 Chromebooks- Now What?!? – By Kim Bruguier

Where to start when your elementary school goes 1:1 with Chromebooks. Sites and applications useful in elementary general music.

Sponsored Sessions

Bringing Keyboards in the Classroom to Your School – By Mark Linn

If you’ve always wanted to start a group piano program at your school, this is the session for you. Classroom music teachers can create more music-makers at their school and complement existing band, orchestra and choir programs. Not only are group keyboard classes a fun and enriching activity, but college-bound students who aspire to become band and orchestra directors will get a head start on learning the keyboard skills that will be required to earn their music education degree. And adding group piano as a classroom option will strengthen your job position by adding more students to your teaching load.

Sponsored Sessions

Listening Like an Adjudicator – By James Weaver

Using adjudicator training programs in the music classroom to teach students to be more critical of rehearsal and performance for improvement, allows for a greater understanding of the role of music adjudication in music education. In this workshop educators will learn how to train their students using the NFHS Adjudicator Training Course to listen to their and their peers performances for a better understand of constructive listening for improvement.

Sponsored Sessions

Drumming in the Classroom: It’s as easy as 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 +! – By Joe Panganiban

Steady beat and rhythmic is crucial to developing young musicians. Music educators understand how challenging it can be to get students up to speed when they receive students who have not had the opportunity to develop these skills. In this session, participants will be able to learn activities and exercises to break down these barriers and get their students confidently playing in their ensembles!

 

Tuesday, November 14th 3:30 PM

Choir Directors’ Ensemble (2 hours and 15 minutes)

Choir Directors’ Ensemble – By Jo-Michael Scheibe

Composer and Conductor, Jo-Michael Scheibe will lead you and your fellow choir director colleagues through efficient rehearsal techniques, effective conducting, a wide variety of standard and new literature, warm-ups and ensemble development tactics during the second annual Choir Directors’ Ensemble. You will spend 4.5 hours together in preparation to perform on the conference main stage to close the conference.

General Interest

Empowering our Voices: Teachers, Students, Cultures – By Marta Frey-Clark

Each of us carries our own culture with us – our values, norms, beliefs, and perceptions. All of this has been framed and created by our individual life experiences. As we sometimes struggle to engage each of our students in truly meaningful ways, we can often (and unintentionally!) create conflict because our worlds are different from those of our students. If you would like to explore new ways to create connections with your students, join Frey-Clark as she shares from her own experiences teaching in Massachusetts, China, and Texas. Hear personal narratives of cultural collision and steps towards intercultural competence. Attendees will be invited to share their own experiences, challenges, and insights. Finally, participants will explore specific strategies for thoughtfully reflecting on their world-views and those of their students in order to bring the best possible musical experience to each student.

Students with Differences/Disabilities

Adaptations in Action: Including ALL Learners in Music Class – By Rachael Fleichaker

This session will explore various ways to give all students equal access to participation in music class. Too often, students with physical, cognitive, or social needs are unintentionally (or intentionally) excluded in music class. They are relegated to the back or side of the room to watch instead of to authentically participate. Adapting group music lessons for students with specific needs, legal responsibilities for music teachers, and successful integration of typical and non-typical learners will be addressed. Video demonstrations are included.

Sponsored Sessions

Technology Engagement: The Music Classroom Leads the Way! – By James T. Frankel

The life of a music teacher is never easy. Well, MusicFirst wrote the book on music technology in the classroom. Using the cloud-based MusicFirst Online Classroom, teachers all over the country have found an effective way to streamline technology in the classroom and keep students engaged. Accessible on all devices, MusicFirst is easy-to-use technology that actually enhances teaching by allowing students to complete time-saving assignments at home or on the go. Bring your own device and learn more about what cloud-based technology can do for you.

Sponsored Sessions

Equipping College Grads to Embrace Technology in Music Education – By Catherine Dwinal

Future music educators! Make yourself more marketable, land your first job, and master modern teaching technologies to have a successful first year as a music teacher. Quaver has developed a brand new college program that gives higher education institutions free access to our Pre K-8 Program along with a variety of digital resources! Participants will explore the benefits of the Quaver College Program that are afforded to both higher education instructors and music education students. Instructors will walk away with the ability to enhance their program with the engaging 21st century resources in the Quaver Curriculum!

TI:ME

Music Technology and the National Standards – By Heath Jones

The session will focus on using the Music Technology National Standards to develop a curriculum to teach a Music Technology class in the middle or high school level.

TI:ME

PASSION! Igniting Young Composers Through Online Tools – By Ryan Henry

This session will focus on sharing a time-efficient method for inspiring young composers and building a collaborative composing culture in district using Noteflight. This method intrinsically motivates students to explore and compose outside of the school day. This session will also spark ideas on how you can expand the walls of your classroom by providing opportunities for across-district student-to-student mentorship and collaborative performances of student compositions.

Sponsored Sessions

Bringing Keyboards in the Classroom to Your School – By Mark Linn

If you’ve always wanted to start a group piano program at your school, this is the session for you. Classroom music teachers can create more music-makers at their school and complement existing band, orchestra and choir programs. Not only are group keyboard classes a fun and enriching activity, but college-bound students who aspire to become band and orchestra directors will get a head start on learning the keyboard skills that will be required to earn their music education degree. And adding group piano as a classroom option will strengthen your job position by adding more students to your teaching load.

Sponsored Sessions

We can all Jam! Finding your groove with Modern Band – By Tony Sauza

Building a groove with your students can always pose a variety of challenges regardless of the type of ensemble. Come explore and learn about crucial topics such as how to build a steady groove with all of your students, movement based activities, layering in instrument sections, keeping the jam interesting by carving out solo sections, improvising song arrangements, and call & response strategies. “Jamming” will look and sound differently depending on your grade level so each age group will be addressed. Come and explore fun, engaging methods developed through Modern Band and Music As a Second Language, but applicable for all!

 

Tuesday, November 14th 4:45 PM

Collegiate

Where We Belong: Engaging, Nurturing and Encouraging All Students Inside (and Outside) the Music Classroom – By Laura J. Andrews

What do you want your students to observe? What do you want your students to discover? What do you want your students to remember, love, and be awed by? What will they come to believe about themselves, others, and the unique environment they share with you? We will share our earliest musical memories, explore how our music experiences and those of our students impact learning and growing together, and examine proactive and productive steps to building collaborative relationships with parents, colleagues and the community so that our students are at home with music–wherever it is taking place.

Guitar

The Baker’s Dozen: Top 13 Things Beginner Guitarists Should Know In Their 1st Year – By Christopher Perez

This session focuses on developing your beginning guitar curriculum through discussion of 13 items (technical, reading and musical) for middle and high school levels. Different methods will be demonstrated and shared so teachers can help students reach their maximum potential while laying a solid foundation for guitar performance.

General Interest

Making the seemingly impossible possible: New terchnologies for students with disabilities – By Alice-Ann Darrow and Christopher Johnson

Realizing the musical rights of students with disabilities often requires implementation of technologies to remove barriers and provide reasonable accommodations that will ensure their equal access to and full participation in music education. Accessibility is best defined as flexibility to accommodate a student’s needs and preferences. New technologies also allow the participation of students with digital music interests that may fall outside the usual types of music offerings. Finally, use of technologies is central to the concept of Universal Design for Learning, and the provisions set forth in the Every Student Succeeds Act.

General Interest

Using the OTL Standards to Inventory Your Secondary Choral/Instrumental Program – By Glenn Nierman

The 2014 Revised National Music Standards outline a bold new direction for many middle school/high school music programs. Is your program ready to offer students a chance to achieve the outcomes that the Standards advocate to lead toward music literacy for students? Does your program offer opportunities to engage a different and broader segment of the student body in musical encounters? This session will offer participants the opportunity to self-evaluate their programs in the areas of scheduling, staffing, curriculum, facilities, and equipment based on the standards outlined in NAfME’s Opportunity-to-Learn Standards (2015).

General Interest

The End of the Participation Grade! – By Brendan Ferrari

In the world of performing ensembles, large class sizes make it challenging to effectively assess every student. Instead of assessing musical skills and knowledge, many teachers grade their students on participation, attitude, and concert attendance. However, this does not document student progress nor give students feedback on their strengths and weaknesses. This session will begin with a presentation of my personal assessment practices of my own 375 choral students in grades 5-8. The second part of this session will consist of attendees sharing assessment strategies that have been successful in their own classrooms.

Sponsored Sessions

QuaverMusic.com DEMO: Lesson Customization – By Catherine Dwinal

With drag-and-drop technology and options to import outside resources, Quaver’s Resource Manager makes it easy for teachers to customize their curriculum resources to meet their needs. Quaver trainers are standing by to help you customize a lesson – maybe for the first time! Drop in to see this powerful functionality in action.

TI:ME

Technology is Changing All the TI-ME – By John Mlynczak

Technology in education allows us to teach students in a more efficient and interactive manner than ever before; however, also presents additional challenges of learning to navigate the ever-changing landscape of education technology. John Mlynczak, TI-ME President, will present the current trends in music technology in order to assist educators in making well-informed pedagogical decisions. This session will outline the most useful music technology solutions and products, and discuss the benefits of joining the TI-ME music technology community.

TI:ME

Music Production and the 21st Century Urban Classroom – By Lincoln Smith

One of the main obstacles to incorporating music production in the classroom are the upfront costs associated with producing and recording music. This session will showcase free and inexpensive tools for music and general ed teachers to incorporate dynamic, creative, and collaborative projects into their teaching.

Sponsored Sessions

How To Talk So Principals Will Listen – By Rick Ghinelli

Suggestions on when and how to communicate with your administrators to gain their support and understanding of your program

Sponsored Sessions

Building Tomorrow’s Musicians with Today’s Technology – By John Jacobson

Teaching elementary general music today comes with no shortage of challenges, but Music Express can help you turn those challenges into opportunities! Created for Grades K-6, Music Express is now enhanced and expanded to offer more content, in more accessible formats to fit a variety of classroom needs and environments. Use your computer, interactive whiteboard, student iPads, or Chromebooks all while teaching engaging, standards-based lessons.

Sponsored Sessions

Engaging your Brass through Popular Music Education – By Bryan Powell

Trying to find new ways to motivate and engage beginning brass students, while still focusing on skills and standards? This session will be a hands-on demonstration on the fun and approachable ways to use student centered music to get players playing diverse repertoire! We will discuss iconographic notation, utilize current play along tracks and song charts, and discussing ways to incorporate brass into current ensembles as well as using popular music to develop a strong foundation.

Sponsored Sessions

Revolutionize Music Making & Recording Using ANY Device! – By Meredith Allen

Soundtrap is a collaborative, easy-to-use, online DAW (Digital Audio Workstation) that works on ANY device (including Chromebooks!) By encouraging early learning of creativity and collaboration through audio, we are preparing our learners for success in an ever-changing, technological, connected world. This collaborative platform has embraced the limitless possibilities of classroom use, to reach all learners across multiple grade and subject areas in academic and creative ways. BYOD – You don’t want to miss this electric, high energy hands-on session. Let’s revolutionize music making – together!

 

Wednesday, November 15th 8:00 AM

Composition

Making Their Own Kind of Music: Teaching Songwriting in the Music Classroom – By Anand Raj Sukumaran

Songwriting is an accessible and culturally relevant art form with multiple points of entry, independence and collaboration. Tapping into this contemporary mode of music making expands the artistic repertoire, technical ability, knowledge base and appreciation of a wider population of students. In this session, we will survey how to structure student learning, investigate a variety of entry points, examine samples of student work and participate in hands-on compositional activities.

Jazz

Building Better Improvisers – By Russell Ballenger

Improvisation, perhaps the most important element in jazz music, can also be the most confusing for both students and teachers alike. In this session, we will discuss ways to get your students listening, grooving, and improvising. Topics to explore include: using call and response, creating rhythmic interest, melodic embellishment, simplifying chord changes, and playing by ear. Handouts will include suggested listening, teaching processes, and additional resources. All levels welcome– middle school through college.

Orchestral

More Innovative Uses Of Technology In Your Orchestra Rehearsal – By Joe Brennan

Using technology in your rehearsal can make them more interesting effective and efficient. Demonstrated will be: iPad, computer, document camera, other hardware, along with software applications. Learn the benefits of showing YouTube movies with Quicktime. Software to be demonstrated include: freeware metronomes and tuners, PowerPoint, Quicktime, word processing, iPad apps and other regularly available software applications. Many of the innovative uses of the technology shown, can be used right away in the rehearsal room with minimal expense, and with equipment and software that is readily available; ways to set up and acquire technology equipment will be discussed.

General Interest

Conducting is Good for Your Health! – By Andrea DeRenzis Strauss

Conducting is the fine art of communicating the composer’s creative intent and the emotional essence of the music, by means of well-defined nonverbal gestures of behaviors. Expressive conducting promotes expressive and meaningful performance. This clinic will encourage you to not only expand your conducting vocabulary, but also to cultivate constant growth towards extending your range of motion, and musicality. By applying Tai Chi and Yoga techniques, you will discover a powerful process to intensify and heighten your bodily awareness, enabling you to transfer movement into expressive conducting, translating musical lines into artistic gestures with improved, posture, balance and flexibility.

General Interest

Differentiated Portfolios for Standards Based Assessment – By Peter Briggs

Using a differentiated portfolio with standards based assessment allows teachers to meet students where they are at and give concrete feedback as they grow. Help students collect evidence of mastery (video/audio/written) using a web or mobile app to create an online portfolio. This free program, FreshGrade, allows teachers to assess by standards, grade and comment on student work, share with parents, and export scores for import into your gradebook. Attendees will look at student portfolios as well as receive examples of differentiated standard based portfolio maps for band, percussion and music theory, though the concept easily transfers to any discipline.

General Interest

Partnering for Effective Advocacy – By Jennifer Mohr Colett and Carolyn Talarr

Who has the power to make a difference for students and improve access to quality music education in their neighborhood schools? *You do* — but you can’t do it alone! In this session, you’ll learn how to identify and connect with stakeholders who will join together with you to take action in support of a complete education for every child. By understanding the dynamics of local governmental institutions and practicing a few simple grassroots organizing techniques, you’ll be ready to ignite a homegrown music revolution!

General Interest

Music And Language: Using Student’s Knowledge of Language to Teach Music – By Jason Kihle

Music and language share similar characteristics. Students are typically more proficient with spoken language than music; language familiarity can be used to increase music proficiency. The first part of this session explores the differences between learning language and music and how this impacts what we do in the classroom. The second part of the session gives attendees practical applications for any type of music classroom. Applications include those for teaching expression, phrase, rhythm and improvisation. Handouts will be available.

Sponsored Sessions

Responding in Music: Instructional Units that Work – By Johanna J. Siebert

This session will share inquiry-based, level-specific instructional units developed as part of NAfME’s three-year grant with the Library of Congress. Utilizing the Library’s considerable resources from its “Teaching with Primary Sources” collection, the choral and general music writing teams created lessons for multiple grade levels that integrate the National Core Music Standards’ Responding artistic process with those of Creating, Performing, and Connecting. Practical formative and summative assessments that measure students’ progress are also included, as well as suggested recordings, sheet music, images, print, and other historical artifacts.

 

Wednesday, November 15th 9:15 AM

Orchestral

Top 10 Strategies to Help Your Beginners Start Strong – By Angela Harman

Come learn some great strategies that will help your beginners learn faster and accomplish more in less time. With carefully planned learning activities students will develop proper habits that ensure a solid foundation for years of string playing. Discover engaging ways to utilize class time, develop finger strength, build beautiful bow holds, create awesome tone, and introduce note-reading, Find out what props are most useful for helping beginners learn proper technique.

General Interest

REAL Assessment: Authentic Assessment Made Easy – By Melinda Wallace

REAL Assessment offers a new approach that incorporates real-life, applicable material and means to assess. This allows REAL to yield meaningful data that works in YOUR classroom. This presentation addresses the basics and provides a rationale for assessment, as well as an in depth look at the theory and research supporting REAL. Broad examples of REAL assessments, with emphasis on manipulation for educator-specific classrooms, and tips for easier assessments and documentation are discussed.

General Interest

The Music Mentoring Project – By Jennifer Collins and Audrey Cardany

Interested in El Sistema-inspired programs and curious about how they can work in your community? In this session we’ll learn about the Music Mentoring Project. The MMP addresses an unjust dichotomy between children who can afford individual lessons on their instrument and children who cannot. In partnership with a local school community, university music students provide after school music lessons to qualifying middle school students. We’ll share our story and some blueprints, including “bumps in the road” and what we learned along the way. It is a joyful story indeed!

General Interest

Demystifying Music SLOs (Student Learning Objectives) – By Cynthia Streznewski

Come on a journey to demystify Music SLOs (Student Learning Objectives). As Music Educators we continually track student progress, whether in general, instrumental or choral music classes. We will start with the National Core Arts Standards and move through Curriculum with Common Units and Assessment pieces that support SMART Goals and SLOs. Learn how to take a specific music learning goal and standard measure to track student progress towards a variety of music goals. Improve your Teacher Effectiveness Evaluation that is based on your SLOs.

General Interest

World Class Minds: Maximize the Creative Brain through Music Education – By Aurelia Hartenberger

Creative and innovative problem solving skills are in high demand in the 21st Century workplace. Have you wondered how creative minds work and how to improve creative abilities in the music classroom? The latest neurosciences findings in creativity will be presented with discussion on how the brain takes the ordinary and creates the extraordinary. Various cognitive theories of creativity and strategies to stimulate your students’ natural creative abilities will be presented to help students connect the dots between creativity and high-order thinking skills. Participants will take away inspiration for providing creative learning environments in the music classroom.

General Interest

Developing Student Portfolios for your Music Program – By Frederick Burrack

Student self-assessment and portfolios are useful to enhance music students’ critical listening skills, analytical skills, student self-monitoring of proficiency, and aesthetic development. This session provides examples of portfolio from schools across the nation. Results for student learning are a result of a nine-year longitudinal study applied in an instrumental music program. Options for using a variety of technologies will be shared, although not required to successfully use portfolios to assess learning in a music classroom or ensemble setting. Ties to the revised National Standards will be provided throughout.